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COUNTING ON

 

YOU

 

At LG&E, we’re dedicated to providing you with safe and reliable power, but we need your help when damage occurs that causes you to lose power. We count on you to make the necessary repairs to any customer-owned electrical equipment so we can restore your power as quickly and safely as possible. If you have overhead electrical service, the diagram to the left illustrates the parts of the electric service that are considered your responsibility as well as those that are our responsibility.

Customer responsibility

Contact a licensed electrician to repair these areas.

  1. Weatherhead/masthead. The vertical pipe-like structure attached to the top of the meter box.
  2. Meter base, which is the box, meter socket and any wiring inside the box.
  3. Items or cables that secure the masthead and/or box to your home.
  4. Attachment point (eyebolt, etc.) that secures the electric service drop.

LG&E responsibility

If you find damage to any of the following areas, call us and we will make the repairs.

  1. Electric distribution poles.
  2. Transformers.
  3. Electric lines within the right-of-way.
  4. Service drop. This is the cable that runs from the utility pole to your home.
  5. Meter (glass-enclosed

DID YOU KNOW…

you are required to notify LG&E if you have installed or plan to install a generator that runs on natural gas for use during an electric power outage? Doing so will help us to provide an adequate supply of natural gas to serve you when you need your natural gas-fired generator. Contact our Customer Service Department for additional information or to notify us of your current and future plans for a natural gas generator.

Home Energy Rebates

bag_o_moneyWhen you consider how you use energy at home, up to 70 percent of your energy usage may be attributed to heating, cooling and appliances. If you plan to make upgrades in these areas, we want to help make these largest energy users even more affordable for you.

Our new Home Energy Rebates Program offers monetary rewards ranging from $50 to $300 to help LG&E and KU residential electric customers offset the purchasing costs of certain ENERGY STAR® qualified appliances, high-efficiency HVAC systems and qualified window film.

For more detail:
http://www.lge-ku.com/rebate/home/default.asp

Ten Things You Should Know About Mold

1. Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma, and other respiratory complaints.
2. There is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment; the way to control indoor mold growth is to control moisture.
3. If mold is a problem in your home or school, you must clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture.
4. Fix the source of the water problem or leak to prevent mold growth.
5. Reduce indoor humidity (to 30-60%) to decrease mold growth by: venting bathrooms, dryers, and other moisture-generating sources to the outside; using air conditioners and de-humidifiers; increasing ventilation; and using exhaust fans whenever cooking, dishwashing, and cleaning.
6. Clean and dry any damp or wet building materials and furnishings within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth.
7. Clean mold off hard surfaces with water and detergent, and dry completely. Absorbent materials such as ceiling tiles, that are moldy, may need to be replaced.
8. Prevent condensation: Reduce the potential for condensation on cold surfaces (i.e., windows, piping, exterior walls, roof, or floors) by adding insulation.
9. In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem, do not install carpeting (i.e., by drinking fountains, by classroom sinks, or on concrete floors with leaks or frequent condensation).
10. Molds can be found almost anywhere; they can grow on virtually any substance, providing moisture is present. There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, and foods.

Home Inspection FAQ

Q. WHAT IS A “HOME INSPECTION”?

A home inspection is an objective visual examination of the physical structure and systems of a home, from the roof to the foundation. Having a home inspected is like giving it a physical check-up. If problems or symptoms are found, the inspector may recommend further evaluation.

Q. WHAT DOES IT INCLUDE?

The standard home inspector’s report will review the condition of the home’s heating system, central air conditioning system (temperature permitting), interior plumbing and electrical systems; the roof, attic, and visible insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors; the foundation, basement, and visible structure.

Q. WHY DO I NEED A HOME INSPECTION?

The purchase of a home is probably the largest single investment you will ever make. You should learn as much as you can about the condition of the property and the need for any major repairs before you buy, so that you can minimize unpleasant surprises and difficulties afterwards.

Of course, a home inspection also points out the positive aspects of a home, as well as the maintenance that will be necessary to keep it in good shape. After the inspection, you will have a much clearer understanding of the property you are about to purchase.

If you are already a home owner, a home inspection may be used to identify problems in the making and to learn preventive measures which might avoid costly future repairs. If you are planning to sell your home, you may wish to have an inspection prior to placing your home on the market. This will give you a better understanding of conditions which may be discovered by the buyer’s inspector, and an opportunity to make repairs that will put the house in better selling condition.

Q. WHAT WILL IT COST?

The inspection fee for a typical one-family house varies geographically, as does the cost of housing. Similarly, within a given area, the inspection fee may vary depending upon the size of the house, particular features of the house, its age, and possible additional services, such as septic, well, or radon testing. It is a good idea to check local prices on your own. Remember all inspections are not alike. Usually you get what you pay for.

However, do not let cost be a factor in deciding whether or not to have a home inspection, or in the selection of your home inspector. The knowledge gained from an inspection is well worth the cost, and the lowest-priced inspector is not necessarily a bargain. The inspector’s qualifications, including his experience, training, and professional affiliations, should be the most important consideration.

Q. CAN’T I DO IT MYSELF?

Even the most experienced home owner lacks the knowledge and expertise of a professional home inspector who has inspected hundreds, perhaps thousands, of homes in his or her career. An inspector is familiar with the many elements of home construction, their proper installation, and maintenance. He or she understands how the home’s systems and components are intended to function together, as well as how and why they fail.

Above all, most buyers find it very difficult to remain completely objective and unemotional about the house they really want, and this may affect their judgment. For the most accurate information, it is best to obtain an impartial third-party opinion by an expert in the field of home inspection.

Q. CAN A HOUSE FAIL INSPECTION?

No. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of your prospective home. It is not an appraisal, which determines market value, or a municipal inspection, which verifies local code compliance. A home inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a house, but rather describe its physical condition and indicate what may need repair or replacement.

Q. HOW DO I FIND A HOME INSPECTOR?

The best source is a friend, or perhaps a business acquaintance, who has been satisfied with and can recommend a home inspector they have used. In addition, the names of local inspectors can be found by searching Internet or the Yellow Pages where many advertise under “Building Inspection Service” or “Home Inspection Service”. Real estate agents are also generally familiar with the service, and should be able to provide you with a list of names from which to choose.

All home inspections performed in Kentucky must be done by a Kentucky Licensed Home Inspector. A list of licensed home inspectors can be found on the Kentucky Board of Home Inspectors web site.

Whatever your referral source, you will want to make sure that the home inspector is a member in good standing of the Kentucky Real Estate Inspection Association (KREIA) in order to be certain of his or her professional qualifications, experience, and business ethics and continuing education.

Q. WHEN DO I CALL IN THE HOME INSPECTOR?

A home inspector is typically contacted right after the contract or purchase agreement has been signed, and is often available within a few days. However, before you sign, be sure that there is an inspection clause in the contract, making your purchase obligation contingent upon the findings of a professional home inspection. This clause should specify the terms to which both the buyer and seller are obligated.

Q. DO I HAVE TO BE THERE?

It is not necessary for you to be present for the inspection, but it is recommended. You will be able to observe the inspector and ask questions directly, as you learn about the condition of the home, how its systems work, and how to maintain it. You will also find the written report easier to understand if you’ve seen the property first-hand through the inspector’s eyes.

Q. WHAT IF THE REPORT REVEALS PROBLEMS?

No house is perfect. If the inspector identifies problems, it doesn’t necessarily mean you shouldn’t buy the house, only that you will know in advance what to expect. A seller may adjust the purchase price or contract terms if major problems are found. If your budget is tight, or if you don’t wish to become involved in future repair work, this information will be extremely important to you.

Q. IF THE HOUSE PROVES TO BE IN GOOD CONDITION, DID I REALLY NEED AN INSPECTION?

Definitely, now you can complete your home purchase with your eyes open as to the condition of the property and all its equipment and systems. You will also have learned many things about your new home from the inspector’s written report, and will want to keep that information for future reference.